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Freedom's just another word...

On CNN Travel today:

"...A TSA worker at Miami International Airport in Florida was arrested for allegedly assaulting a co-worker who had repeatedly teased him about the size of his genitals.

"The insults stemmed from an X-ray of the accused captured during a training exercise with the airport's full-body scanning machines, the report said...."

I've looked up other articles on the images, and the comments sent in. Some say they'd rather have this technology because it's from a distance, it's anonymous, the person viewing the scanner isn't going to be in the same area as the "real" person. So... the ridicule won't matter because in actual use, the person will never hear it? Isn't objectification enough of a problem in other areas? (Note that I'm avoiding the concern over just how transitory these images will be, as if those doing the scanner would never have cellphone cameras of their own to record the "best" images, as if there wouldn't be later government decisions to keep the images around "just a little longer", as if no glitch would "forget" to erase them, as well as the concern about showing images of pre- and early- adolescent children.)

I'll take the pat-down when I need to make the choice. I'd rather have someone in front of me, where I can see them, where they can see me, because even if they never meet my eyes, we will both know they are touching a real person, an actual physical human being, and not just an anonymous and therefore valueless image.

Comments

( 4 comments — Leave a comment )
ysabetwordsmith
May. 8th, 2010 04:12 am (UTC)
Thoughts
I hope the airport gets sued for forcing someone to expose himself.
cimeara
May. 11th, 2010 01:37 am (UTC)
Re: Thoughts
I believe that as it's a government agency, no sueing would be allowed? :-(
jenwrites
May. 8th, 2010 04:27 pm (UTC)
I'm really torn about this. I see the value of the technology, but there's no way to guarantee that the person behind it won't have the emotional maturity of a junior high school student. *sigh*
cimeara
May. 11th, 2010 01:53 am (UTC)
Given the skill set required and (I'm presuming here) the accompanying pay rate, it's practically guaranteed that some of the people will be, well, less mature about it than, say, a healthcare professional.

And I don't approve of the value per discomfort. I don't even approve of the rest of what's been implemented. They can show me a truckload of pointy objects taken from passengers and they still can't prove to me that any of them would have been used in an attack, and they still can't promise that this will make it 100% safe. Yes, it's horrible when hundreds of people die in an airplane crash, or when thousands died on 9/11. But it's more insidiously horrible when millions of people give up their time, their privacy, their self-respect and literally walk through hoops in ever-escalating solutions to whatever was the last threat. What happens when someone brings a vial of airbourne virus on a plane? Will they then make every passenger get a vaccination before boarding? Or go through a sterilization chamber?
( 4 comments — Leave a comment )